Saturday, 13 August 2016

Bhaja Moshla Recipe / Bengali Dry Roasted Spice Powder Recipe ~ Just Recipes


Bhaja Moshla is the Bengali word for Dry Roasted Ground whole spices that are used in many a dish from Bengal. Unlike the Southern part of India, where there are a number of different combinations of dry roasted ground spices, either used in cooking or eaten as an accompaniment with food, Bengal has only a few, Bhaja Moshla being one very important mix among them. Now there are a number of variations of Bhaja Moshla as you can find out, by either searching online or offline, by taking to your Bengali friends or reading Bengali cook books. 

The recipe of the Bhaja Moshla I have shared with you is very simple and is the one which is used in my family very frequently. Bhaja Moshla is so aromatic that it can almost instantly uplift any dish over which it is sprinkled. Since it is dry roasted before being ground, it can be used in a cooked dish right at the end. A few dishes that usually use Bhaja Moshla are Doi Begun / Aubergine in spiced yogurt sauce, any lentil curry / dal, doi bora/deep fried lentil fritters in yogurt, Ghugni / Yellow peas curry, Raita / Yogurt dip etc.

AUBERGINE IN SPICY YOGURT SAUCE / DAHI BAINGAN

YELLOW PEAS CURRY



CHOLAR DAL / SPLIT BENGAL GRAM LENTIL CURRY
(Click the link just above for the recipe)

SIMPLY SPRIKLE BHAJA MOSHLA OVER YOUR BOWL OF YOGURT AND SEE MAGIC HAPPEN

The colour of the Bhaja Moshla is usually dark brown, but depending upon the colour and quantity of dry red chillies used, it might acquire a red tinge. Let's have a look at the ingredients.



BHAJA MOSHLA RECIPE ~

AUTHOR ~ PIYALI MUTHA
YIELDS ~ 50 GMS. APPROXIMATELY
TYPE ~ DRY SPICE POWDER
TIME ~ 5 MINUTES TO DRY ROAST + 5 MINUTES TO GRIND

INGREDIENTS ~

1) 2 TBSP HEAPED CUMIN SEEDS
2) 2 TBSP HEAPED CORIANDER SEEDS
3) 5 DRY RED CHILLIES

PROCEDURE ~


1) Take a frying pan. Add in cumin seeds, coriander seeds. Remove the stem of the red chillies, tear them into smaller pieces and then add them to the pan.

2) Dry roast them taking care not to burn them. Keep stirring constantly so that they receive heat evenly and are roasted nicely. You know it is time to remove the pan from the burner once the cumin seeds starts crackling and the spices become aromatic. Remove the frying pan from the burner and allow the spices to cool off .

3) Ensure that the jar of the grinder or food processor does not contain any moisture. You want to store the Bhaja Moshla for a few months smelling as fresh as this and any moisture will spoil it. Transfer the contents of the pan into the jar of the grinder.
Grind to a smooth powder. 

Transfer to an air tight container.

PICTORIAL STEP WISE PROCEDURE ~

1) Take a frying pan. Add in cumin seeds, coriander seeds. Remove the stem of the red chillies, tear them into smaller pieces and then add them to the pan.


2) Dry roast them taking care not to burn them. Keep stirring constantly so that they receive heat evenly and are roasted nicely. You know it is time to remove the pan from the burner once the cumin seeds starts crackling and the spices become aromatic. Remove the frying pan from the burner and allow the spices to cool off .


3) Ensure that the jar of the grinder or food processor does not contain any moisture. You want to store the Bhaja Moshla for a few months smelling as fresh as this and any moisture will spoil it. Transfer the contents of the pan into the jar of the grinder.


Grind to a smooth powder. 


Transfer to an air tight container. Please take care that the container is completely dry before transferring the Bhaja Moshla into it. Also keep in mind that you will put the lid of the container only when the ground Bhaja Moshla is completely cool.


Store in a cool dry place. No need to refrigerate. Use a clean dry spoon to take out the powder and sprinkle over your dishes. Please avoid cross contamination to keep your Bhaja Moshla fresh and aromatic as long as it lasts.

Use Bhaja Moshla in your dishes and let me know how it enhanced there aroma and taste in the comment section below or via e-mail. Continue the adventure in your kitchen always. 

RADHUNI ~



Before I sign off from this post I would want to introduce you all to another indigenous whole spice from Bengal called RADHUNI. I am not aware what it is called in English but it looks like a distant cousin of carom seeds/ajwain and celery seeds. Radhuni is found in grocery stores in Bengal and I am yet to come across it in Indian or Bangladeshi store abroad. It is commonly used as atempering in dal/ lentil curry or as one of the five spices in Panch Phoron. Radhuni imparts a very strong and distinct aroma to the lentil curry or any other curry that it is used in.